A collection of things I'm doing, notable sciencey things, and most likely a lot of minecraft based stuff too.

21st September 2013

Post

I made a new personal blog, gonna shut this one down.

Follow me on the new one if you want, I suppose.

http://bardofthemaine.tumblr.com/

17th July 2013

Link reblogged from Racism 101: Are you a Racist? with 161 notes

Racism 101: Are you a Racist?: Want Goodies but Can’t Afford Them? →

racismschool:

An anonymous donor has offered to buy goodies for 3 people. If you can’t afford brownies or cookies but would really love to have some (and help Save Our Rights NOW!) All you have to do is reblog this post.

The donor has already selected 3 random numbers and whoever reblogs this post on that…

25th June 2013

Post

Why do people keep following me? I don’t post anything.

26th March 2013

Photo reblogged from a wild liz appears with 2,918 notes

Source: almightybob

20th March 2013

Photoset reblogged from a wild liz appears with 8,696 notes

lora-does-things:

guavas:

Alright so Peter and I found this hat in the “Chino” here, which is a weird kind of store they have in Spain that sells basically everything including a bunch of weird kitschy stuff. From far away I just thought it was a normal Spongebob hat, but when I got closer I could see the horrifying face. And then I noticed the logos…

SpongoBob SouarepaNts

and

SopnoBBgb SpeatuqaNrs???

FUCKING HELL

Tagged: WHY

Source: guavas

28th February 2013

Link reblogged from cavalcade of anger and fear with 1,333 notes

neckbeard femme: karynchaotic: dionthesocialist: Listen up, folks! Stop scrolling!... →

karynchaotic:

dionthesocialist:

Listen up, folks! Stop scrolling! We’ve got a big one on our hands.

Today, the Supreme Court actually heard arguments in favor of striking down key sections of the Voting Rights Act. You know that act, right? It’s the 1965 law that many consider the greatest achievement of the African American Civil Rights Movement of the 60’s. It assured that blacks would have the right to vote, and struck down many laws that were used as intimidation and discrimination against black people, especially in the South.

An important part of the Voting Rights Act stated that certain states, cities, and provinces were not allowed to change their voting process at all without approval from the justice department. In an era where Republicans seem desperate to change the laws to make it more difficult for people of color to vote, this section is incredibly important.

Now, the claim is being made (by Alabama, of course) that that section of the law is unconstitutional because it prevents self-governing by those affected territories. The 2006 reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act is being challenged. This isn’t just a fringe movement. It was heard in front of the Supreme Court, who will actually discuss and hand down a decision on it. Justice Scalia in particular agrees that this key provision should be struck down. He literally called it a “racial entitlement” that is outdated.

A SUPREME COURT JUSTICE CALLED THE RIGHT OF BLACKS TO VOTE A “RACIAL ENTITLEMENT.”

The Republicans have not changed their tune at all since getting spanked in the most recent election cycle. They are still attacking the basic function of a democracy and particularly targeting people of color. Our brothers and sisters in those affected areas are in danger of losing their right to vote without hassle, intimidation, or discrimination.

found through vee, but i wanted to reblog the whole post not the link/preview. 

Tagged: FUCK GUYS COME ONFUCKIN REPUBLICANSFIRST POST IN A WHILEW/E

Source: dion-thesocialist

30th January 2013

Post reblogged from a wild liz appears with 6 notes

hellscabanaboy:

honeybells replied to your post: honeybells replied to your post: anthropicmoose…

maine is where you go when you fail at massachusetts

Tagged: yestruenot sciencebut true

Source: hellscabanaboy

18th January 2013

Photo reblogged from NASA with 351 notes

n-a-s-a:

Dark matter in CL 0053-37 
A “map” of the dark matter distribution (black contours) in the cluster of galaxies CL0053-37, as obtained from the weak lensing effects detected in the WFI images, and the X-ray flux (green contours) taken from the All-Sky Survey carried out by the ROSAT satellite observatory. The distribution of galaxies resembles the elongated, dark-matter profile. Because of ROSAT’s limited image sharpness (low “angular resolution”), it cannot be entirely ruled out that the observed X-ray emission is due to an active nucleus of a galaxy in CL0053-37, or even a foreground stellar binary system in NGC 300.
Credit: ESO 

n-a-s-a:

Dark matter in CL 0053-37 

A “map” of the dark matter distribution (black contours) in the cluster of galaxies CL0053-37, as obtained from the weak lensing effects detected in the WFI images, and the X-ray flux (green contours) taken from the All-Sky Survey carried out by the ROSAT satellite observatory. The distribution of galaxies resembles the elongated, dark-matter profile. Because of ROSAT’s limited image sharpness (low “angular resolution”), it cannot be entirely ruled out that the observed X-ray emission is due to an active nucleus of a galaxy in CL0053-37, or even a foreground stellar binary system in NGC 300.

Credit: ESO 

16th January 2013

Photo reblogged from NASA with 816 notes

n-a-s-a:

LGSF, the Magellanic Clouds and Comet McNaught 
Credit: ESO 

n-a-s-a:

LGSF, the Magellanic Clouds and Comet McNaught

Credit: ESO 

Tagged: scienceastronomy

16th January 2013

Photo reblogged from The Science of Reality with 145 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Simulated Mars Mission Reveals Body’s Sodium Rhythms
Clinical pharmacologist Jens Titze, M.D., knew he had a one-of-a-kind scientific opportunity: the Russians were going to simulate a flight to Mars, and he was invited to study the participating cosmonauts.
Titze, now an associate professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University, wanted to explore long-term sodium balance in humans. He didn’t believe the textbook view – that the salt we eat is rapidly excreted in urine to maintain relatively constant body sodium levels. The “Mars500” simulation gave him the chance to keep salt intake constant and monitor urine sodium levels in humans over a long period of time.
Now, in the Jan. 8 issue of Cell Metabolism, Titze and his colleagues report that – in contrast to the prevailing dogma – sodium levels fluctuate rhythmically with 7-day and monthly cycles. The findings, which demonstrate that sodium is stored in the body, have implications for blood pressure control, hypertension and salt-associated cardiovascular risk.
Titze’s interest in sodium balance was sparked by human space flight simulation studies he conducted in the 1990s that showed rhythmic variations in sodium urine excretion.“It was so clear to me that sodium must be stored in the body, but no one wanted to hear about that because it was so different from the textbook view,” he said.
He and his team persisted with animal studies and demonstrated that the skin stores sodium and that the immune system regulates sodium release from the skin.
In 2005, planning began for Mars500 – a collaboration between Russia, the European Union and China to prepare for manned spaceflight to Mars. Mars500 was conducted at a research facility in Moscow between 2007 and 2011 in three phases: a 15-day phase to test the equipment, a 105-day phase, and a 520-day phase to simulate a full-length manned mission.
Crews of healthy male cosmonauts volunteered to live and work in an enclosed habitat of sealed interconnecting modules, as if they were on an international space station. Titze and his colleagues organized the food for the mission and secured commitments from the participants to consume all of the food and to collect all urine each day. They studied twelve men: six for the full 105-day phase of the program, and six for the first 205 days of the 520-day phase.
“It was the participants’ stamina to precisely adhere to the daily menu plans and to accurately collect their urine for months that allowed scientific discovery,” Titze said. The researchers found that nearly all (95 percent) of the ingested salt was excreted in the urine, but not on a daily basis. Instead, at constant salt intake, sodium excretion fluctuated with a weekly rhythm, resulting in sodium storage. The levels of the hormones aldosterone (a regulator of sodium excretion) and cortisol (no known major role in sodium balance) also fluctuated weekly.
Changes in total body sodium levels fluctuated on monthly and longer cycles, Titze said. Sodium storage on this longer cycle was independent of salt intake and did not include weight gain, supporting the idea that sodium is stored without accompanying increases in water.
The findings suggest that current medical practice and studies that rely on 24-hour urine samples to determine salt intake are not accurate, he said. “We understand now that there are 7-day and monthly sodium clocks that are ticking, so a one-day snapshot shouldn’t be used to determine salt intake.”
Using newly developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies to view sodium, Titze and his colleagues have found that humans store sodium in skin (as they found in their animal studies) and in muscle.
The investigators suspect that genes related to the circadian “clock” genes, which regulate daily rhythms, may be involved in sodium storage and release. “We find these long rhythms of sodium storage in the body particularly intriguing,” Titze said. “The observations open up entirely new avenues for research.”

neurosciencestuff:

Simulated Mars Mission Reveals Body’s Sodium Rhythms

Clinical pharmacologist Jens Titze, M.D., knew he had a one-of-a-kind scientific opportunity: the Russians were going to simulate a flight to Mars, and he was invited to study the participating cosmonauts.

Titze, now an associate professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University, wanted to explore long-term sodium balance in humans. He didn’t believe the textbook view – that the salt we eat is rapidly excreted in urine to maintain relatively constant body sodium levels. The “Mars500” simulation gave him the chance to keep salt intake constant and monitor urine sodium levels in humans over a long period of time.

Now, in the Jan. 8 issue of Cell Metabolism, Titze and his colleagues report that – in contrast to the prevailing dogma – sodium levels fluctuate rhythmically with 7-day and monthly cycles. The findings, which demonstrate that sodium is stored in the body, have implications for blood pressure control, hypertension and salt-associated cardiovascular risk.

Titze’s interest in sodium balance was sparked by human space flight simulation studies he conducted in the 1990s that showed rhythmic variations in sodium urine excretion.
“It was so clear to me that sodium must be stored in the body, but no one wanted to hear about that because it was so different from the textbook view,” he said.

He and his team persisted with animal studies and demonstrated that the skin stores sodium and that the immune system regulates sodium release from the skin.

In 2005, planning began for Mars500 – a collaboration between Russia, the European Union and China to prepare for manned spaceflight to Mars. Mars500 was conducted at a research facility in Moscow between 2007 and 2011 in three phases: a 15-day phase to test the equipment, a 105-day phase, and a 520-day phase to simulate a full-length manned mission.

Crews of healthy male cosmonauts volunteered to live and work in an enclosed habitat of sealed interconnecting modules, as if they were on an international space station. Titze and his colleagues organized the food for the mission and secured commitments from the participants to consume all of the food and to collect all urine each day. They studied twelve men: six for the full 105-day phase of the program, and six for the first 205 days of the 520-day phase.

“It was the participants’ stamina to precisely adhere to the daily menu plans and to accurately collect their urine for months that allowed scientific discovery,” Titze said. The researchers found that nearly all (95 percent) of the ingested salt was excreted in the urine, but not on a daily basis. Instead, at constant salt intake, sodium excretion fluctuated with a weekly rhythm, resulting in sodium storage. The levels of the hormones aldosterone (a regulator of sodium excretion) and cortisol (no known major role in sodium balance) also fluctuated weekly.

Changes in total body sodium levels fluctuated on monthly and longer cycles, Titze said. Sodium storage on this longer cycle was independent of salt intake and did not include weight gain, supporting the idea that sodium is stored without accompanying increases in water.

The findings suggest that current medical practice and studies that rely on 24-hour urine samples to determine salt intake are not accurate, he said. “We understand now that there are 7-day and monthly sodium clocks that are ticking, so a one-day snapshot shouldn’t be used to determine salt intake.”

Using newly developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies to view sodium, Titze and his colleagues have found that humans store sodium in skin (as they found in their animal studies) and in muscle.

The investigators suspect that genes related to the circadian “clock” genes, which regulate daily rhythms, may be involved in sodium storage and release. “We find these long rhythms of sodium storage in the body particularly intriguing,” Titze said. “The observations open up entirely new avenues for research.”

Tagged: sciencebiologyposting again?posting again.

Source: newswise.com